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German Shorthaired Pointer

Country of Origin: Germany
Height: Normal height is between 21 and 25 inches at the wither
Weight:

Males weigh between 55 - 75 pounds.

Females weigh between 40 - 65 pounds.

Color: Their color can be solid liver, solid black or a combination of liver and white or black and white such as liver and white ticked, black and white ticked, liver patched, black patched, white & liver or white & black ticked, liver or black roan.
Coat: The coat is short and thick and feels tough to the hand; it is somewhat longer on the underside of the tail and the back edges of the haunches. The hair is softer, thinner and shorter on the ears and the head. These dogs are very water resistant and are considered a hose and go breed.
Description:

"The German Shorthaired Pointer is a very versatile dog even though they can be a challenge. These dogs are highly intelligent and devoted to their humans. The GSP, as they are sometimes known by, has a short, thick, waterproof coat plus webbed feet to assist in retrieving from land and water. They have a keen sense smell that makes them great trackers, drug detectors, and hunters. These dogs have a drive to "seek and find", be extremely willing to please and is very brave around prey. In Germany long ago, the GSP was very popular with the poor who could not afford to own a different dog for every different task. Breeder Evelyn Maloney says, "They [the Germans] bred this dog to do absolutely everything!" The German Shorthaired Pointer breed has the number 24 rank in the AKC's recognized breeds. These dogs are very "pack" and human oriented. When it is well exercised and had a good breeding, it will be a calm housedog between playtimes. Even the pups that are bred strictly for show quality, will still retain a hunting instinct. This breed is friendly, but will guard its house. The GSP is known as the dog that will protect without aggression towards its family. With everything, this breed has a downside because nothing is perfect. The downside to this breed is they take a lot of patients and training, plus require a lifetime investment of time and effort. On the good side, these dogs are easily trainable and love to learn! "

  By Melissa Rogers

Ariel's Kennels

www.arielskennels.com

 

 

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